Difference between revisions of "Commercial Open Source Software"

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Commercial Open Source Software ([http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22commercial+open+source+software%22&btnG=Google+Search COSS]) usually contains elements of FOSS, however limits availability of some enhanced functionality to closed proprietary software, thereby creating a path to the same old system and vendor lock-in and so does not qualify as FOSS as a whole.
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Commercial Open Source Software ([http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22commercial+open+source+software%22&btnG=Google+Search COSS]) usually contains elements of FOSS, however limits availability of some enhanced functionality to closed proprietary software, thereby creating a path to the same old vendor lock-in, and so does not qualify as FOSS as a whole.
  
 
"Dual-licensed open source" is an administration method whereby companies provide software with open source licenses and also license the very same code with a proprietary license for organizations whose procurement systems require one.  The principle with dual-licensed software is the same: it can be FOSS if all versions are made available in a FOSS license approved by the [http://www.opensource.org/ OSI].
 
"Dual-licensed open source" is an administration method whereby companies provide software with open source licenses and also license the very same code with a proprietary license for organizations whose procurement systems require one.  The principle with dual-licensed software is the same: it can be FOSS if all versions are made available in a FOSS license approved by the [http://www.opensource.org/ OSI].

Revision as of 10:36, 29 June 2008

Commercial Open Source Software (COSS) usually contains elements of FOSS, however limits availability of some enhanced functionality to closed proprietary software, thereby creating a path to the same old vendor lock-in, and so does not qualify as FOSS as a whole.

"Dual-licensed open source" is an administration method whereby companies provide software with open source licenses and also license the very same code with a proprietary license for organizations whose procurement systems require one. The principle with dual-licensed software is the same: it can be FOSS if all versions are made available in a FOSS license approved by the OSI.